Walker recently retired form the University of Virginia Hospital where he worked as a medical illustrator. He received his BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University in painting and printmaking. His work has been shown in numerous exhibitions most recently in 2012 at the McGuffey Art Center. His paintings and drawings can be found in numerous private collections.

Frank Walker
Honorary Member of
BSMC of Charlottesville, VA 

Frank Walker graduated  from Lane High School in 1971 in Charlottesville, VA.  Walker earned a bachelor of fine arts degree in painting and printmaking at Virginia Commonwealth University before enlisting in the U.S. Army.

 

Walker later worked in the graphics department at Fort McPherson in Atlanta before returning to Charlottesville in the late 1970s. A retired Marine hired Walker as a medical illustrator in the department of art, photography and television at the University of Virginia Medical Center. There, his attention to detail continued to serve him well. “You can’t mistakenly illustrate a body part” for medical students, for practicing physicians, surgeons and anesthetists, Walker says; the consequences can be deadly.

Artist Frank Walker captures the value of human life

Frank Walker’s studio is full of artwork, art supplies, frames and hundreds of military models: soldiers, guns, ammunition, tanks and uniforms. A historian of both African American history and American military history, the Army veteran is a stickler for accuracy.

 

Walker recently retired form the University of Virginia Hospital where he worked as a medical illustrator. He received his BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University in painting and printmaking. His work has been shown in numerous exhibitions most recently in 2012 at the McGuffey Art Center. His paintings and drawings can be found in numerous private collections.

Frank Walker: Black Stories is made possible  through the generous support of the Blue Moon  Fund and albemarle  magazine.

Frank Walker’s commissioned portraits included in Black Stories begin with research. Before drawing, he interviews his subjects to identify the quintessential piece of their biography that will result in the rendering of a true likeness. Other images in the show are of unsung heroes from African American history and vernacular life.

In the exhibition his use of materials and drawing technique explore the relationship between high and low art. Highly worked precise drawings in graphite and red and white chalk, are rendered on plywood and more recently paper bags